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Samoca 35 III
Samoca M-35
Samoca EE-28

Fuji Emi-K


Shinano Lacon


Mamiya Magazine 35

Mamiya Ruby Standard
Rank Mamiya

Canon Demi


Konishiroku Pearl

Konica I
Konica II
Konilette 35
Konica Auto S2
Konica C35 V

Ricoh 800 EES

Ricoh Auto Shot

Fujica Rapid D1

Fujica 35-EE

Yashica Mimy

Yashica Half 17 Rapid
Yashica Lynx-14E

Yashica Lynx 1.4


GAF Anscomatic 726


Olympus OM10


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Japan takes over

In the 60s Germany lost its top spot in camera manufacturing to Japan. What the Japanese cameras perhaps lacked in imagination, they made up for it in quality, features and efficient production, hence price.

Samoca 35 III

Samoca cameras were made by Sanei Sangyo Co., later renamed to Samoca Camera Co. They started in 1952 with the rather quirky looking Samoca 35 series, the one shown below is the third incarnation. It was a very small camera, similar to the Beirette and Steinette/Hunter35/Primo range to which the camera showed some likeness. It had a rather limited range of shutter speeds but did feature helical focusing. It had a peculiar conical button on the shutter housing which needed to be pushed in to cock the shutter and release the wind lock mechanism. Around 1956 a rangefinder version with an optional light meter was introduced, the 35X or Super. A rather bulky version with uncoupled light meter was the Samoca E.M.

Samoca 35 III photo

A Samoca 35 III with Ezumar Anastigmat C 50/3.5. The logo of the company, as seen on the shutter, consisted of three As arranged in a triangle; apparently inspired by the company name "Sanei", which can be phonetically understood as "three As" in Japanese.

Samoca M-35

Around 1958 Samoca started building cameras that were more conventional looking but nevertheless quite stylish, such as the M-35 below. It was a rangefinder camera with the viewfinder arranged right above the lens as to avoid any horizontal parallax. It had a wind lever and a Prontor-style shutter with speeds ranging from 1s to 1/300s. It had a 50mm f/3.5 Ezumar lens with helical focussing. A version with faster f/2.8 lens was the M-28, which was also sold in the USA as the Tower 57. A model with uncoupled light meter was called the LE, a later version with coupled light meter, f/2.8 lens and a more modern look the LE-II, also rebranded as Tower 57-A. The M-35 itself was also sold as the Hanimex A35 with Hanimar-branded lens.

Samoca M-35 photo

The quite stylish-looking Samoca M-35 with Ezumar 50mm f/3.5 lens in a Synchro shutter presumably made by Samoca itself.

Samoca M-35 photo

Top view of a Samoca M-35 with frame counter integrated in the wind lever and film reminder integrated in the rewind button.

Hanimex A35 photo

Rebranded Hanimex A35 version of the Samoca M-35. The top housing inlays were white with a black border instead of plain black as on the Samoca version.

Samoca EE-28

The last of the Samoca cameras appears to be the EE range. It had an automatic exposure mechanism and the light meter needle was visible in the viewfinder. It also had a manual exposure mode. The build quality and finish appear of a lesser standard than the earlier models, and it was not much of a looker either.

Samoca EE-28 photo

A Samoca EE-28 with Samoca 45mm f/2.8 lens.

Oshiro Optical Works Emi-K

The Emi-K was produced in 1956 only by Oshiro Optical. It was a viewfinder camera with a 50mm f/2.8 Fujiyama Eminent Color lens, presumably that's why the camera was called Emi-K. It is nothing special and quite similar to other Japanese cameras from that era. Nevertheless, there is something I like about it. It was also sold as "Three C.s" and "Spinney". Very little it known about the company and also the origin of the Fujiyama lens is unclear, as the current lens maker Fujiyama says it was founded in 1975, two decades later. Oshiro also made the Hanimo 35 with selenium cell light meter.

Oshiro Optical Works Emi-K Fujiyama photo

Emi-K with a 50mm f/2.8 Fujiyama Eminent Color lens.

Shinano Lacon

The Shinano Lacon was a fairly obscure camera made during the early 1950s by the Shinano Camera Company, who also made the somewhat better known Shinano Pigeon. I must confess I was more charmed by the name than the actual camera, which is a straightforward viewfinder camera without many thrills, but in terms of looks clearly inspired by the Leica screwmount cameras, especially when viewed from above. The single viewfinder window looks oddly out of place in a top housing large enough to accommodate a rangefinder.
Functionally the Lacon was not that different from the Pigeon, both were simple viewfinder cameras with front cell-focusing lens, a leaf shutter with a limited range of speeds and a removable camera back to load film.
An early version with a small single viewfinder mounted directly onto the top plate also existed. The Lacon was later superseded by the Lacon C, which had a larger tophousing with integrated shutter release button but otherwise similar to its earlier incarnation.

Shinano Lacon photo

A Shinano Lacon with Shinano Lacor 45mm f/3.5 lens.

Mamiya Magazine 35

Mamiya is one of the better-regarded Japanese camera makers and still exists today. Although primarily known for its medium-format cameras, it has also produced a wide range of rangefinder cameras, starting with the Mamiya 35 series in the late 40s, early 50s. In 1957 the company introduced a rather unusual camera, the Magazine 35, which on first glance looks like many other rangefinders of that era, but it had a trick up its sleeve: an interchangeable back. Basically, the camera body could be separated from the top housing and lens without any light leaks, so one could change film speed or type without needing to rewind the film (provided one had an additional camera back).
Although in theory a great concept, the camera was not very popular due to its very high price and the fact that the backs themselves cost about half the price of the camera itself, and you needed at least one extra back for the system to be of any use. Not many other cameras with interchangeable back have been made, the Kodak Ektra, Adox 300, plus some Zeiss Ikon Contarex and Contaflex models, none of them being particular popular. Perhaps professional photographers would carry multiple with different around, perhaps even more convenient than having to change camera backs, whereas amateur photographers did not really have the need? Nevertheless, an interesting piece of camera history.

Mamiya Ruby photoMamiya Ruby photoMamiya Ruby photo

A Mamiya Magazine 35 with Mamiya-Sekor 50mm f/2.8 lens in Seikosha-MXL shutter, a Compur-Rapid clone. A fairly plain looking but heavy, high quality rangefinder with interchangeable camera back. The back could be removed by turning the red locking knob at the bottom of the back, which would first close the metal plate covering the film gate (see top photo) and then release the back itself. The back also had a rewind knob, note there is none present on the cameras top housing.

Mamiya Ruby Standard

In addition to innovative experiments like the Magazine 35, Mamiya produced several more regular rangefinder models, such as the Mamiya Crown, Metra and Ruby. The latter was first introduced in 1959. It was a rangefinder camera which featured a selenium-cell meter and a Mamiya-Sekor 48mm f/1.9 or f/2.8 lens, later production (apparently called the Mamiya Ruby Standard) had a Mamiya-Kominar 48mm f/2 lens. It's most distinctive feature was the film speed dial on front of the camera. Different Mamiya models are a little hard to identify as the names were generally not indicated on the camera bodies, and little information is available about them, let alone instruction manuals. However, Butkus has a manual for the Tower 18A, which was a rebranded version of the Mamiya Ruby with f1/.9 lens.

Mamiya Ruby photo

A 1961 Mamiya Ruby with Mamiya-Kominar 48mm f/2 lens. This exact version was also sold as the Tower 18B.

Mamiya Ruby photo

Top view of the Mamiya Ruby.

Rank Mamiya

The Rank Mamiya introduced around 1963 was a cheaper version of the Mamiya Ruby. It was also known as the Mamiya 4B but was sold under the name Rank in the UK. Compared to the Ruby it had a slower and wider Mamiya-Sekor 40mm f/2.8 lens, somewhat comparable to the Minolta Uniomat but without exposure automation.

Rank Mamiya photo

Mamiya 4B rebranded as Rank Mamiya.

Canon Demi

Canon as a company will need little introduction, as it still is the largest camera maker in the world. The company was a relatively late starter, founded not long before WWII, but it rapidly became a major force due to its high-quality but affordable cameras. One of these was the 1963 Canon Demi. It was a half-frame camera, like the Minolta Repo, which would take 135mm film but used a smaller film format and would therefore fit more photos on a single film roll.
The Canon Demi was a manual camera with a limited range of shutter and aperture options, which were controlled by a single setting ring. On top of the camera was a lightmeter read out where one had to match two needles to get the correct exposure. One needle was controlled by a large selenium cell and indicated the amount of available light, the other needle was adjusted by turning the exposure ring.

Canon Demi photo

The funky-styled Canon Demi with 28mm f/2.8 lens (equivalent to 40mm on full frame) in Seikoshi shutter. Note the small round viewfinder window right above the lens, which was a Keplerian viewfinder as described below.

An unusual feature of the Canon Demi was its Keplerian viewfinder. Most cameras from that time had reverse Galilean viewfinders, which was essentially a two-lens telescope turned backwards, which gave a wide angle view. The basic version of a Keplerian viewfinder also had two lenses, but they were further apart and importantly, the focal point of the front lens was inside the viewfinder. By putting a mask at this focal point one would get a viewfinder image with sharply defined edges, in contrast to the Galilean viewfinder which had fuzzy edges and framing was therefore more inaccurate.
The drawback of the Keplerian viewfinder was that it inverted the image. On the Canon Demi this was corrected by the use of prisms. Therefore, the viewfinder window was offset relative to the eyepiece. Turret-style viewfinders as well as the Leica multifinders such as the VIOOH used a similar design.


Canon Demi photo

Rear view of the Canon Demi. A little peculiar was the focus distance scale at the back.

Canon Demi photo

Interior of the Canon Demi. Note the small vertical film frame, typical of half-frame cameras.

Canon Demi photo

Top view of the Canon Demi, showing the match needle lightmeter. If you look carefully you can see that the viewfinder window is offset relative to the eye-piece.

Quite a few versions of the Canon Demi were produced, including the Demi-S with faster lens and a larger exposure range, and the Demi-C with interchangeable lens for which a 50mm f/2.8 telelens was available. Later the automatic exposure Demi EE range was introduced. Early models had a selenium cell around the lens, later models had a CdS sensor where previously the viewfinder was located, and a brightframe viewfinder where the selenium lightmeter cell used to be.

Konishiroku (Konica) Pearl

Konica is a company with a very long history in photographic materials, but probably best-known for taking over Minolta when it failed but soon after killing off the camera product line. Konica-Minolta is now a well-respected producer of photocopiers.
The company started making 35mm cameras just after WWII with a range of classic-looking rangefinders (branded Konica), but it appears to be a little known secret that it also made several folding cameras, the Pearl range, a long time before. At the time the company was still called Konishiroku. It was only simplified to Konica (short for Konishiroku Camera) much later, adopting the name of its 35mm range.
The Pearl range included rollfilm cameras that used 120 or 127 film with a variety of frame sizes. The 1949 Pearl I was developed from the Semi Pearl, 'Semi' indicating a half frame camera with a 6x4.5 cm frame format on 120 film. It had several interesting features, such as a key to wind the film at the bottom of the camera, a unit-focussing lens mount and an uncoupled rangefinder. Later models had a coupled rangefinder.

Konica Konishiroku Pearl photo

Konishiroku Pearl with Hexar 75mm f/4.5 lens in Durax shutter. Note the lack of any wind knobs on top of the camera, as it has a wind key at the bottom.

Konica I

The 1947 Konica I (at the time simply known as Konica, without the I) was Konishiroku's first 35mm camera. It shared several features with early Leicas, such as the retractable (but not interchangeable) lens with helical focus, the (excellent quality) rangefinder and the wind knob with frame counter, but the similarity ends there as the Konica had a leaf shutter and a rear door that could be opened to load film. Also, the shutter release was on the shutter itself, which needed to be cocked by hand. Thus, the camera had no double-exposure prevention.
Several cosmetic variants existed, detailed on the excellent Konica I-II-III camerawiki page. The example below is a Type B as it has the name Konishiroku embossed at the back and the serial# engraved on the top housing. The lens was a 4-element Hexar, initially available with f/3.5 aperture, but later a f/2.8 version could also be had. The last version had an f/2.8 Hexanon. The shutter was a Konirapid, very similar to a Compur-Rapid, later updated to the Konirapid-S with flash synchronisation.

Konica I photo

Konica I type B with coated Konishiroku Hexar 50mm f/3.5 in Konirapid shutter from around 1948. This example is missing some of the leatherette, which was rather brittle and peels off easily.

Konica I photoKonica I photo

(left) Back side of Konica I with company name embossed in the leatherette. (right) Top view of the Konica I showing the extended collapsible lens.

Konica II

The 1952 Konica II was the successor of the Konica I above and quite a step up in quality. In fact, I think this is one of the finest and best-built Japanese leaf-shutter rangefinders, easily competing with its German equivalents. Compared to the Konica I had a body-mounted shutter release, an accessory shoe (which was curiously missing on the Konica I) and a higher contrast rangefinder than the already very good one on the Konica I. It also had a separate T button on the front plate. On the downside, the shutter still needed to be cocked manually. The lens was still retractable, but instead of giving the lens a small twist and then push it in, on the Konica II one had to pull a little lever on the focussing knob at the infinity setting, after which the knob could be rotated further, thus retracting the lens fully. The Konica II had a much more modern look than the fairly spartan Konica I, with wind knobs with integrated frame counter and film reminder dial, an eye-catching curved front plate and a metal bottom plate. The door catch was perhaps even a little over-engineered, after rotating a ring similar to the one on the bottom plate of a Leica screw-mount camera, one had to push in this ring to release the catch that opened the rear door.
As with the Konica I, several cosmetic variants were available, including a version with Hexar lens that was missing the T knob. Early production had a Konirapd-S shutter, later replaced by Konirapid-MFX or Seikosha-MX shutters. The top model, the Konica IIA, had a six-element f/2 Hexanon lens.

Konica II photo

The magnificent Konica II with its excellent five-element 50mm f/2.8 Hexanon, which had a yellow-brownish coating instead of the more common purpley-blue one on the Konica I and most other contemporary cameras. The accessory shoe has an engraved diamond with the letters EP in it, indicating that this was an export model sold at one of the Allied Army military bases in Japan. I love the look of this camera and was very pleased to finally get my hands on one!

Konica II photo

Top view of the Konica II showing off its impressive lens-shutter assembly.

Konilette 35

OK, and then there was a Konilette 35. A bit of a let-down after the delights of the early Konicas above, but clearly aimed at a different market. It was introduced in the late 50s around the same time as the Konica IIIA. The Konilette 35 was a simple viewfinder camera of medium build quality with a (presumably three-element) front-cell focussing f/3.5 Konitor lens with unmarked shutter having a limited 1/25-1.200 range. It had a Retina style clasp to open the rear door and featured a lever wind. In the top housing it had a frame counter as well as a rather flimsy looking accessory shoe. Although the viewfinder looks as though it may be of the bright-frame type in fact it isn't, it is a simple Galilean type without a frame.

Konilette photo

Konilette 35 with Konitor 45mm f/3.5 lens and its dedicated lens hood.

Konica Auto S2

Around 1959 Konishiroku introduced the Konica S, a rangefinder with a modern look and a light meter. This evolved into the camera pictured here, the Auto S2. This 1965 camera was all about the lens, a six-element fast f/1.8 Hexanon, although it was also well-featured otherwise, including a parallax-corrected coupled rangefinder, automatic exposure as well as a manual mode, and a Copal SVA shutter with a range of 1 - 1/500 s. Note that this was the first Konica that no longer had the company name 'Konishiroku' marked on the lens.

Konica Auto S2 photo

Konica Auto S2 with fast Hexanon 45mm f/1.8 lens. Mine rattled and was loose, so I had to open it up only two find two loose screws inside.

Konica Auto S2 photoKonica Auto S2 photo

(left) Hexanon 45mm f/1.8 lens with front ring removed. Some cleaning marks visible on the front element. (right) Prontor-style Copal SV shutter.

Konica Auto S2 Hexanon photo

Hexanon lenses have always had an excellent reputation and Konica was obviously aware of this, using the lens design as the main feature on the box for the Auto S2. It was a six-element lens in four groups, a double-Gauss design similar to the Schneider Xenon and Zeiss Biotar.

Konica C35 V

Soon after, Konica, like many other companies, turned their attention to smaller, more portable cameras. In 1968 it introduced the C35, less featured than the S2 but a lot smaller and very successful, surviving in several incarnations until the 1908s. The one here is the 1971 C35 V, which presumably stands for viewfinder, as that's what it has instead of the rangefinder on the regular C35. However, it does have a nifty little extra window in the viewfinder that shows the zone focussing symbols, so the rangefinder is not too badly missed. This feature appears to be copied from the Minolta Hi-Matic C.

Konica C35 V photo

A chrome Konica C35 V with funky green leather featuring a Hexanon 38mm f/2.8 lens. I really need to give it the clean-up it deserves! I don't think the leather cover is original

Ricoh 800 EES

Ricoh is another Japanese camera maker that still survives today. In fact, I used to have one of its more recent digital endeavours, a Caplio R4. A capable little shooter but it didn't nearly survive as long as many of its non-digital predecessors. When Ricoh started making cameras its main line was the Ricoh 500 series, which started as a classic-looking rangefinder but evolved into an extensive range of compact cameras, the 500 G being the best-known model. The Ricoh 800 EES from around 1974 had a highest shutter speed of 1/800, to which is thanks its name, faster than the typical 1/500 on other cameras including the Ricoh 500 G. It was a rangefinder with fully automatic exposure. Apparently it was also sold as the Elnica F although I don't have one so I can't confirm it is identical.

Ricoh 800 EES photo

A Ricoh 800 EES with 40 mm f/2.8 Rikenon lens and fast 1/800s top shutter speed.

Ricoh Auto Shot

Ricoh also produced some more exotic cameras, like the Auto Shot. At first glance it looked like it was missing a viewfinder until you realised that it was integrated in the light meter cell surrounding the lens. It was also not immediately clear what was the top and what was the bottom of the camera, as the wind knob and strap lug were at the bottom. Wind knob, one may ask? Did not all cameras of that era have wind levers? Yes, but this little camera had in fact a motor wind!
Despite its small size it did shoot 36x24mm pictures on standard 135 film. In automatic mode it had a fixed shutter speed of 1/125 s with the aperture being controlled by the light meter. The camera could also be operated in manual mode by selecting the aperture, the shutter speed was 1/30 s in that case.

Ricoh Auto Shot photo

The Ricoh Auto Shot. Apparently it came with a lens cap that would double as a flash unit but unfortunately this example did not.

Ricoh Auto Shot photo

Top view of the Ricoh Auto Shot. Apparently it came with a lens cap that would double as a flash unit but unfortunately this example did not.

Fujica Rapid D1

Fuji (nowadays called Fujifilm) is a photographical company with a long history and one of the few that still produces photographic film today. In fact that's how the company started in 1934. It started producing cameras after WWII under the name Fujica, including a fair amount of compact cameras. It entered the Rapid camera market in 1965 with several models, including the Rapid D1. Like the Ricoh Auto Shot above, it had a motor wind but had a more classic look. It could shoot in automatic as well as manual mode.

Fujica Rapid D1 photo

A Fujica Rapid D1 with 28mm f/2.8 Fujinon lens.

Fujica Rapid D1 photo

Inside of the Fujica Rapid D1 showing its small half-frame film gate.

Fujica Rapid D1 photo

Fujica Rapid D1 with dismantled lens to get to the shutter. Fujicas had a good reputation but this shutter does little to impress me.

Fujica 35-EE

The Fujica 35-EE was introduced in 1961 and boasted to be the first camera with three exposure modes: automatic, semi-automatic and manual. Available light was measured using a selenium cell, the 'Electronic Eye', hence the name EE, a common name at the time and already seen several times on this page. Automatic exposure did not, however, mean full automatic control, as in Auto mode the camera would basically function in shutter-priority mode: it would automatically select the correct aperture based on the light values as measured by the lightmeter. If light was insufficient, a red dot would appear in the viewfinder window. In semi-automatic mode, one could read the correct aperture in the lightmeter window, but this aperture setting still needed to be set manually. The camera also had an early implementation of an auto exposure lock, as the aperture setting would be fixed by pushing down the shutter release button halfway. In principle one could reframe and refocus the image whilst keeping the exposure fixed.

Fujica 35-EE photo

A Fujica 35-EE with fast 45mm f/1.9 Fujinon lens.


Fuji was a company that liked doing things slightly differently, which was also evident on the Fujica 35-EE. To focus the camera one would turn a thumb wheel at the back of the camera, a setup quite similar to the Voigtlander Vitessa. Turning this wheel would focus the lens by moving it in and out as a single unit without rotating it, as well as move the rangefinder and the parallax corrected viewfinder frame. The rewind lever could be found at the side of the camera instead of at the top, whereas the auto-reset frame counter was found at the bottom of the camera. A ring around the lens base that looked like a focus ring was in fact the shutter speed setting ring. To get to slow shutter speeds (slower than 1/15) one needed to push a little button at the front of the camera, presumably to avoid camera shake by selecting a too slow shutter speed by accident while using automatic mode.
The Fujica 35-EE was preceded by the less automated 35-SE and superseded by the more automated 35 Auto-M. In addition Fuji made a small range of interesting half frame and rapid cameras, like the Rapid D1 above.

Fujica 35-EE photo

Two auxiliary lenses were also available for the Fuica 35-EE, a 35mm wide angle and 85mm telelens. These lenses would simply screw onto the filter ring of the standard lens, but had a complicated way of focussing: one needed to read of the focus distance on the distance dial on top of the camera and then adjust the focus to match the conversion scale printed on the lens. About as cumbersome as the auxiliary lenses of the Kodak Retina C cameras, although at least one did not have to remove the front cell of the standard lens first! Both auxiliary lenses came with their own parallax-adjusted viewfinder.


Yashica Mimy

The cute little Mimy was the most basic of several half-frame Yashica models. Half-frame cameras (18x24mm, half the size of the 35mm format but using the same film) had a brief spell of popularity in the mid 1960s; other examples on this site are the Canon Demi and Minolta Repo. The Mimy was essentially a dressed-down version of the Yashica 72-E (see below). Like the 72-E it was a viewfinder camera but with fixed focus and without manual exposure controls. Due to the short focal length of the lens (28mm, equivalent to about 40mm on full frame) the depth of field was relatively large, which was why Yashica could get away with a fixed focus lens. The focus distance was set at 3m, so one needed to stop down to at least f/11 to get infinity focus. Thus, this camera was more practical for street photography.
The Mimy was equipped with auto exposure: upon pushing the release button half-way down the bottom left corner of the viewfinder frame would change from red to yellow if light was sufficient. The camera could also run in aperture-priority mode, although it appears this was mainly meant to be used with flash, as the lightmeter window did not clearly indicate if the exposure was fine. Film was advanced by means of a small thumb wheel at the bottom of the camera. The Mimy was succeeded by the Mimy-S, which had a redesigned viewfinder area and a lens that could be focussed.

Yashica Mimy photo

A Yashica Mimy with fixed-foxus 28mm f/2.8 lens.

Yashica Mimy photo

The innards of a Yashica Mimy with its front removed. The aperture is set by moving two metal slits in opposite directions to form a diamond-shaped iris, one of the slits is visible just to the right of the lens. On this example the two slits had stuck together, probably due to lack of use, but after loosening them up this little Mimy was once again working as it should.

Yashica 72-E

The Yashica 72-E looked similar to the Yashica Mimy about but had the advantage of a lens with adjustable focus as well as manual exposure control. It had a uncoupled lightmeter, so one had to manually transfer the exposure readings to the shutter. It did not have any auto exposure modes like the Mimy. The name 72-E was derived from the fact that one could make 72 exposures on a single 36-exposure roll of 35mm film. Yashica must have meant this as a selling point, but personally it would put me off! Of course one could buy film with fewer exposures if making 72 photos seemed intimidating. Considering the camera was mainly meant to be fun and portable to make snapshots I'd probably have gone for a more likeable name, like indeed the Mimy.

Yashica 72-E photo

A Yashica 72-E with Yashinon 28mm f/2.8 lens in Copal shutter.

Yashica Lynx-14E

The Yashica Lynx range was a series of rangefinder comparable to the Minolta Hi-Matic range, pairing fast high-quality lenses with easy-to-use camera bodies, except that unlike the Hi-Matics the Lynx range were fully manual cameras. The top model amongst the Lynx was undoubtedly the 1965 Lynx-14, which sported an impressive Yashinon 45mm f/1.4 lens - as far as I am aware the fastest fixed lens to be put on a fixed lens rangefinder. Somewhat unusual compared to its contemporaries was that the Lynx-14 (as well as other models in the range) had a lightmeter mounted in the tophousing next to the rangefinder instead of in the lens body. Hence, when using filters one had to adjust the exposure manually.
The Lynx-14E was introduced in 1968 and added IC-controlled manual exposure, which required an extra battery even though these were only used for metering, but did away with the light meter needle. Instead, 'OVER' and 'UNDER' indicator lamps in the viewfinder would guide the exposure. The system was activated by a switch next to the lens.

Yashica Lynx-14E photo

A Yashica Lynx-14E with its magnificent Yashinon 45mm f/1.4 lens in Copal-SVE shutter.

Yashica Half 17 Rapid

Another Yashica half-frame camera was the Half 17 Rapid. It was a compact modern-looking camera with sleek lines featuring a coupled lightmeter with automatic exposure. The lightmeter cell was integrated into the lens mount. The camera sported a fast Yashinon 32mm f/1.7 lens. The camera was perhaps let down by the lack of a rangefinder, although the reduced depth-of-focus of half-frame cameras made this less of an issue than it would have been on a full frame camera with a similarly fast lens. As the name indicated, the camera used the Rapid cassette system (see Minolta Rapid 24 for details). The camera had a thumb wheel to advance the film instead of a wind lever. It was succeeded by the Half 14, which had an even faster f/1.4 lens as well as a CdS lightmeter.

Yashica Half 17 Rapid photo

A Yashica Half 17 Rapid with Yashinon 32mm f/1.7 lens.

Yashica Half 17 Rapid photo

Rear view of a Yashica Half 17 Rapid with an uptake cassette loaded. Note the small film frame and the thumb bottom left for film advance.


GAF Anscomatic 726

The 1966 GAF Anscomatic 726 was reportedly made by Petri, a Japanese camera specialising in small compact cameras as well as SLRs, so that is why this camera is listed here. GAF was the new name of the original Ansco company in the USA, which itself was a subsidiary of Agfa after it was bought out in 1928 (see also Ansco Karomat page). They sold many cameras under license. As far as I am aware Petri did not make any 126 format (Instamatic) cameras, so I can only assume they build this according Ansco's designs.
Considering the 126 format films were generally pretty terrible, the Anscomatic 726 stood out amongst the bunch. It had a parallax-corrected rangefinder, a coupled CdS lightmeter with auto exposure, a decent speed lens, a good range of shutter speeds up to 1/500 and a socket for flash cubes to finish it off.

GAF Anscomatic 726 photo

A GAF Anscomatic 726 that's got its fair share of bumps and bruises with an Anscomatic 38mm f/2.8 lens. This is one of the lenses which has the questionable honour of being listed as radioactive by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA due to the high amounts of thorium present in the glass. Thorium lenses are now banned but the radiation dose from these lenses was in fact very low.

Olympus OM10

Olympus might not be as well known for its SLR cameras as Canon, Nikon or Minolta, but it has been a big player in the Japanese camera industry for a long time and is still successful today. In fact, it is still producing digital versions of its old product lines such as the OM and the Pen, even reviving some of the classical lines of these cameras. The value the company puts on its history is clear from its well-documented Olympus Museum site.
In any case, Olympus was relatively late in the SLR game, with the introduction of the OM-1 in 1973, claiming to be the lightest and smallest SLR camera at the time. This was 10 years after their first venture into SLR with the iconic half-frame Olympus Pen F. The 1979 OM10 was Olympus' first consumer grade SLR. It was an aperture-priority automatic exposure camera. It was light and easy to use, and a big success. The main complaint was the lack of exposure control, for instance for exposure compensation one had to adjust the ISO dial. However, a manual adapter was available which allowed fully manual operation.
The OM system lens line-up was excellent and included many specialty lenses such as tilt-shift, macro and superfast prime lenses. Due to the OM-system's popularity, lenses and camera bodies are plentiful today and, other than specialty items, very affordable, so a good choice for the budding film photographer.

Olympus OM10 photo

An Olympus OM10 SLR camera with its standard Zuiko Auto-S 50mm f/1.8 lens and manual adapter fitted. The most mysterious part of this camera is the little bitcode thingy on the front just below the shutter button. No clue what it means, it's the same on all OM10s and it only appeared on this model I think.

Olympus OM10 photo

Top view of an Olympus OM10 showing the various controls. Note that what looks like a shutter speed dial is in fact a film speed dial, as this camera does not have a speed dial; the auto exposure system selects a speed for you. Only by installing the accessory manual adapter (visible above the rewind knob) can one override the auto exposure system.